THE ALLY GROUP

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What is an All Inclusive Ally?

 

Washington and Evans (1991) define an ally as "a person who is a member of the dominant or majority group who works to end oppression in his or her personal and professional life through support of, and as an advocate with and for, the oppressed population" (p.195). 

 

 

An All Inclusive Ally (Modified from Poynter, K.,& Schroer S. (1999)):

 

1. Is a safe person for anybody to share his or her identity or human circumstance with.

2. Has good intentions that can be seen and felt.

3. Doesn't depend on just one person to represent an entire group.

4. Can hear a variety of opinions within a group or community.

5. Can see the similarities and differences between all people and other forms of oppression.

6. Is consistently supportive.

7. Is beyond tolerant; s/he is supportive, understanding, and accepting.

8. Celebrates others.

9. Is not expecting rewards or forgiveness.

10. Is not motivated by guilt.

11. Is willing to admit s/he doesn't know everything.

12. Knows when to speak up, and when not to.

13. Is comfortable with people assuming that they identify with a minority group or have a minority human circumstance.

Some more definations of what an Ally is:

to unite or join for a specific purpose 
any person who works toward combating phobia's and ism's

An Ally is commonly referred to as:

· a friend 
· an advocate 
· a supporter 
· a homie 
· one who believes (supports) another’s idea 
· compatriot 
· Someone who stands up/fights-speaks out-supports another group in order to end oppression-racism-prejudice or gain rights a smiling face and a warm and true heart 
· bud 
· a bright light at the end of the tunnel.

 


An Ally Is... - Visible Support - Safe Zone - Role Model - Someone who combats heterosexism 

An Ally Can Be... - Activist - Speaker-Educator 

An Ally Is Not... - Expert on Issues - Counselor - Spokesperson for all

 


An Ally is a memeber of the agent group who rejects the dominant ideology and takes action against oppression out of a belief that eliminating oppression will benefit agents and targets (Page 76, Teaching For Diversity and Social Justice).

 


A White Ally is a person who activly works to eliminate racism.  This person may be motivated by self-interest in ending racism, a sense of moral obligation, or a commitment to foster social justice, as opposed to a patronizing agenda of "wanting to help those poor People of Color."  A White ally may enguage in anti-racism work with other Whites and / or People of Color (Page 98, Teaching For Diversity and Social Justice).

 


An ally is a member of the agent social group who takes a stand against social injustice directed at target groups (Whites who speak out against racism, men who are anti-sexist). An ally works to be an agend of social change rather than an agent of oppression.  When a form of oppression has multiple target groups, as do racism, ableism, and heterosexism, target group members can be allies to other social groups they are not part of (lesbians can be allies to bisexual people, African American people can be allies to Native Americans, blind people can be allies to people who use wheelchairs).

(Appendix 6B, Teaching For Diversity and Social Justice).

 


A heterosexual ally is one who takes action against homophobia and heterosexism (heterosexual privilege) because they believe it is beneficial to lesbian, gay, and bisexual people and because they believe it is in their own self-interest as well  (Page 146, Teaching For Diversity and Social Justice).